Tuesday, April 16, 2013 Friday, December 7, 2012
When the SEC wrote its financial disclosures rules, it wasn’t thinking about Facebook or Twitter.

Steven Thel, a former SEC attorney

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings is under investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission for a Facebook post he wrote in June telling his 200,000-plus subscribers that Netflix members had enjoyed over 1 billion hours of content that month. The SEC says this information should have been made public under the agency’s fair disclosure rules, which require companies to make public information that is considered “material” to shareholders.

Hastings responded to the probe on, that’s right, Facebook. “We think the fact of 1 billion hours of viewing in June was not “material” to investors,” adding that “posting to over 200,000 people is very public.”

What do you think? Should a social media post be considered a form of disclosure?

Thursday, May 24, 2012
Millward Brown just came out with its 2012 report on the world’s most-trusted brands. Topping the list: Apple, IBM, Google and McDonald’s. (McDonald’s?!) Facebook and Mastercard also saw a big boost from past years.
Read the report.

Millward Brown just came out with its 2012 report on the world’s most-trusted brands. Topping the list: Apple, IBM, Google and McDonald’s. (McDonald’s?!) Facebook and Mastercard also saw a big boost from past years.

Read the report.

Tuesday, May 22, 2012 Friday, May 18, 2012
Most people buy IPOs like they buy lottery tickets — they’re hoping for a big win. There’s the potential for a big gain, but on average, it’s a big loser.

Geoff Considine, principal of Colorado-based research firm Quantext.

Remember, Facebook devotees: Investing in IPOs can be risky business. Read more. 

Thursday, May 17, 2012 Wednesday, May 16, 2012

cnet:

Everything you need to know about the Facebook IPO (FAQ)

A great explainer for the uninitiated. Thanks, CNET! We have our own Facebook IPO explainer over here once you’ve got the basics down.

cnet:

Everything you need to know about the Facebook IPO (FAQ)

A great explainer for the uninitiated. Thanks, CNET! We have our own Facebook IPO explainer over here once you’ve got the basics down.

Friday, May 4, 2012

cnbc:

‘No Plans to Invest in Facebook IPO’: Warren Buffett
Warren Buffett said Friday he had no plans to invest in the Facebook’s initial public offering, but said what’s happening with the social media giant is “extraordinary.”
Full Story

WWWD — What Would Warren Do? (Kiplinger’s Jennifer Schonberger doesn’t think the Facebook IPO is a sure thing, either.)

cnbc:

‘No Plans to Invest in Facebook IPO’: Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett said Friday he had no plans to invest in the Facebook’s initial public offering, but said what’s happening with the social media giant is “extraordinary.”

Full Story

WWWD — What Would Warren Do? (Kiplinger’s Jennifer Schonberger doesn’t think the Facebook IPO is a sure thing, either.)

Monday, April 9, 2012

Facebook’s acquisition of the popular photo-sharing site will be its biggest buy to date, the Wall Street Journal says. That makes sense, in light of upcoming events: Facebook is less than a month away from its much-publicized IPO, which could be worth more than $100 billion. 

Facebook’s acquisition of the popular photo-sharing site will be its biggest buy to date, the Wall Street Journal says. That makes sense, in light of upcoming events: Facebook is less than a month away from its much-publicized IPO, which could be worth more than $100 billion

Thursday, March 29, 2012

What We’re Reading, 3/29/12

Every morning, we poll the staff and round up their favorite economic, financial and political reads of the day. Making the office rounds today: campaign spending, the Facebook IPO, and student loans … for kindergartners.

"Obama Outspends Republican Campaigns by Millions," by Jack Gillum (AP). This number is worth a thousand words: Obama has spent $135 million on his campaign operations, versus the combined $132 million spent by his challengers. “What can a long primary season mean to an opponent?” Asks Letter editor Ken Bazinet. “Well, while Mitt Romney makes his long and sometimes suspect slog towards the magic number of 1,144 delegates, the Obama campaign has hired 500 staffers and opened campaign offices in nearly all 50 states, including five offices in unlikely battleground state Arizona.”

"Facebook Targeting May IPO," by Shayndi Raice and Randall Smith (Wall Street Journal). Facebook made headlines when it filed for its initial public offering in February. Now it looks like the social media monolith will go public in May, becoming the biggest IPO in history.

"Bain Gave Staff Way to Swell IRAs by Investing in Deals," by Mark Maremont (Wall Street Journal). How did Mitt Romney build his multimillion-dollar IRA? New analysis of Bain Capital’s internal documents reveals a co-investing strategy that helped employees multiply their accounts many dozen times over. Unfortunately for Romney, he’ll still get hit with a 35% capital gains tax upon withdrawal.

"Student Loans on Rise — for Kindergarten," by Annamaria Andriotis (Smart Money). Parents, especially high-income parents, increasingly take out loans for private K-12 education. “As if mounting college student-loan debt weren’t bad enough,” says staff writer Lisa Gerstner.

"Larry Summers and the Technology of Money," by Conor Myhrvold (Technology Review). The former U.S. Treasury secretary talks Amazon, Square and the rise of e-commerce — which he says is the most important innovation in information technology currently impacting the market.

"Mitt’s 1 Percent Moments," by Steve Kornacki (Salon). A collection of things that make Romney look like an “out-of-touch rich guy.” We almost forgot the NASCAR incident. 

"Outside the Supreme Court, the Health-Care Party’s Over. Now What?" By Laura Vozzella (The Washington Post). The Supreme Court arguments over health care reform attracted hordes of reporters, protesters — and a cast of professional line-standers and other characters just out to have a good time. “In Washington, we have politicians, lobbyists, staff and, well, these guys,” quips web editor David Muhlbaum.

"Marx at 193," by John Lanchester (London Review of Books). Tackle this thought-provoking essay after a few cups of coffee — in it, Lanchester analyzes what Marx got right (and wrong) about capitalism.